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Tag : Aputure Fresnel Lens

22 Jan 2020

Aputure Fresnel Lens Updated January 22 2020

Updated January 22 2020

Two factors motivated me to update this post. First on June 22 2018, a visitor to this page, “Moreno” stated the following:

“Have you tried the fresnel with a single AD200 in the dual bracket? You might find the following interesting. I measured the output at full zoom with both the AD200 and AD600 Pro, with each set to full power. Based on the power of each flash, you’d expect the AD600 Pro to measure about 1.5 stops more output than the AD200. That wasn’t the case, the AD200 was actually a full stop brighter than the AD600 Pro. And the AD200 light pattern was clean, without the horseshoe pattern of the AD600 Pro.”

Secondly someone had written to me privately to ask if the V2.0 Aputure Fresnel fits against an AD600. Since I don’t own a V2.0 version I could not answer based on my own experience. I never answer private emails simply because I get repetitive questions which do not happen if questions are posted on my blog.

So here are my own test results using one of the Aputure v1.0 units I own and are reviewed below this update:

 

I can only surmise that since Fresnel lenses were originally designed for a bare bulb with a reflector, the frosted front blub on the 600 Pro glass suffers in terms of power from the bulb design. Also in my tests I did NOT find that the AD200 to be more powerful than the Flashpoint 600, yet like Moreno’s findings more powerful than the 600 Pro, but only in the fully focused position. In the fully flooded position my findings were the 600 Pro to be more powerful then the AD200 using the bare bulb. The AD200 with the round head attachment proved to be more powerful in both focused and flooded positions than the 600 Pro. I did not nor do I plan to test the AD200 with the OEM Fresnel head.

The use of the AD200’s optional Roundhead is impressive. I can only assume that it is a result of all the light thrown forward rather than scattered inside the modifier. I feel that the round head configuration mimics a classic Fresnel light source, a bare bulb with a reflector behind it. In testing of my K5600 Big Eye Fresnel I found that a shiny reflector placed behind the bare bulb of either my AD200 or AD600 improved the power of the light which is the classic configuration of lighthouses as well as K5600’s line of Joker constant lights.

UPDATE August 6 2019

I have continued to utilize these modifiers in many different situations. They are very versatile especially in wind. In the past I had relied on PCB Omni reflectors, but find that these modifiers work better for my needs. The ability to focus or flood the modifier is very convenient. This unit is no longer made and has been replaced by the 2X version. I have not tried that one. I’ve been helping a British retailer engage women in the new EV motorcycle space so I asked a friend who is also a racer to ride my bike to take some photos. Most if not all photos of women in/near/on a motorcycle cater to men. Bikinis, tight jeans, mini skirts, you name it. I wanted to create imagery that appeals to women….

These were all shot later in the day using a Flashpoint 600 strobe. Pentax 645Z at 1/1000th with varying f stops. My goal was to have the shots not appear lit, but still have high production value. Most of these shots were with the Aputure fully flooded. The exception is the last shot where I focused the Fresnel on Kathy’s face.

UPDATE April 19 2018

Recently I have favored Fresnel lighting for my on location outdoor sessions. The flexibility of the Fresnel’s ability to focus its beam, it’s matching light quality to sunlight and the stability of the modifier in high wind makes it a winner for my work. The other aspect of my work I’ve been trying to improve is the ability to make a lit scene not look lit. It takes much more finesse to light any scene as if it is just natural light, but with a high production look. Still much more to learn, but the Aputure Fresnel is a remarkable tool. My strobe of choice for this session was the Flashpoint xPLOR600 Pro.

This is how the location looks in natural light.

Just using enough fill from the Fresnel so as not to cast a strobe shadow takes practice. 1/320th f4.5

By far the most difficult lighting balance on that day was this shot. To not overpower the ambient light, cast any strobe shadows and yet fill in the talent took some effort. 1/250th f3.5

1/250 f3.5

1/500th f2.8

UPDATE February 25 2018

I’ve written an on location post where I’ve utilized an Aputure head.

UPDATE January 26 2018

I’ve recently written a post about my use of the xPLOR600/eVOLV200s with several different modifiers for a session. You can find that post here.

UPDATE October 2 2017

I have written a post about a dance session I conducted that uses these items. You can view that post here.

UPDATE September 10 2017

I recently posted an article on my use of all Godox units in one session. The article includes the use of this product. You can view that post here.

My initial findings for the Aputure Fresnel Lens – July 6 2017

Because I work with so many theatrical stage lighting designers and bow to their artistry along with how COMPLEX their jobs become, I am very familiar with the Fresnel lens. It’s a staple of the constant light stage world and was very popular in the early Hollywood celebrity portrait days. Many shooters now love ‘soft light’ the softer the better in their minds. But the use of bare bulb lighting and Fresnel light is very powerful and effective to convey the right mood in a shot. So for a whopping $69.00 I decided to buy the Aputure Fresnel Lens off of Amazon.

An example of my use of bare bulb lighting.

The body of the modifier is made of fiberglass and is extremely sturdy. The Bowens mounts fit perfectly into all of my Bowens mount lights including Godox and Xplor units. The construction is very well executed. I appreciate the 7″ reflector around the lens which easily accepts the grids and barn doors I have for my other hard reflectors. If you don’t want the reflector it’s easy enough to unscrew from the housing.

A handy degree marking is built into the left side of the housing. Adjustment is easy and smooth by loosening a knob on the opposite side of the mount to slide the lens forward or backward. Extending the lens reduces the angle of light.

Looking ‘into’ the housing from the back of the unit.

The front view of the unit. Four hex screws hold the 7″ reflector to the unit.

One of the things I will find out in actual use is how much light bleed from the vents on the side of the housing cause. I believe that will depend on where/how the strobes are placed in relation to the subject. Since the unit is made to be used with all Bowens mount units the vents are placed to dissipate heat. I don’t imagine that the light bleed from the vents will affect my work unless I’m using the unit for an overhead light which may bleed onto any seamless I’m using. Time will tell and if that is the case I will simply use some Cinefoil to mask off any bleeding light. Stay tuned….

I wanted to determine how much light loss happens using this modifier compared to a bare bulb or 7″ cone. My little test was done outside in daylight. Using an Xplor 600 at maximum power (1:1), 20 feet from the wooden wall, measured with a Sekonic L-358 light meter, ISO 100, 100th of a second. My finding:

  • Bare Bulb: f9.0
  • 7 inch cone: f9.0
  • Aputure Fresnel: f8.0

The f8.0 was when the unit is set at the maximum spread of 42 degrees. Things change when I zoomed the Fresnel to the 15 degree mark which yields f9.0 at the same distance.

No strobe, shaded daylight illuminates the wooden wall as my control shot.

Fresnel set to 42 degrees, 20 feet from the wall.

Fresnel set to 15 degrees 20 feet from the wall.

Obviously I will be continuing to update this post when I use it on a commercial shoot. In September I have a dance session where I plan to use this unit along with a gobo strobe modifier. At this point I’m very pleased with the construction and operation of the unit. Stay tuned.

14 Aug 2019

CononMark 120cm – Glow EZ Lock Deep and Mole Richardson 412 on location

I was recently hired to create some publicity imagery for the stage performance of “Anything Goes.” Since the location of that play takes place in the 1930s aboard a luxury vessel the client wanted the mood to reflect that time and space. So we chose a local theatre’s upper balcony to shoot some of the scenes along with the doors leading into the lobby. The windows are round like portholes so they’d give the correct mood and story to the shots.

The interior of the theatre as it is normally lit. You can see the strobe pointing up I used to illuminate the ceiling for my shot in the upper balcony area.

Upper balcony area where we found the best mood feeling.

Both my client and I wanted an old school Hollywood glamour look to the images and using a large Fresnel would produce just that sort of light. I chose to use my Mole Richardson 10” Fresnel spotlight I have converted into a strobe as the key light for the indoor shots.

Mole Richardson 412 with barndoors is my keylight. Above it is the Bowens gobo projector. Just below is my CononMark 120cm used as my focusing fill light.

The upper balcony of the theatre’s lobby does not have any windows, so I used my Bowens Universal Spot Attachment for Gobos to give the illusion of a grand framed window on the wall. I used my CononMark 120 as the fill light since a focusing rod modifier can be subtlety focused to highlight the area I want filled.

In this light test show you can see no ‘window’ appears.

Two of the final upstairs shots.

On the walls of the theatre balcony are very elegant sconces and I did NOT want to overpower their illumination with my strobes, so using barn doors on the Mole Richardson Fresnel was necessary to prevent spill. I also used a 20 degree gridded Aputure Fresnel to illuminate the chandelier closest to the talent and finally an 8” coned strobe on the lower level to illuminate the ceiling. All strobes are Flashpoint 600s. Once those shots were created and the client was pleased after viewing them in real time on my iPad we moved to the outdoor area with the circular windows in the doors.

I chose to use three bare bulbs to throw light out through the windows toward my lens to create a very Hollywood look and feel to the images. The tiled patterned floor of the entry way is old school in an elegant style from the era we were trying to replicate.

In this instance my key light was my Glow EZ Lock Deep Parabolic Quick Softbox (48″). I only used the inner disk and baffle as diffusion. I find that for my work and client’s taste that configuration works best 80% of the time. In my personal view that modifier is a wickedly good value and produces excellent quality of light. And man is it ever easy to setup and strike! A little tip, I carry a short piece of ½ PVC in the bag about two feet long. I simply place it over the shaft of the octa and push down until the thing locks in place. SO convenient, no trying to maneuver myself as I am trying to push the dang center shaft locking collar down. BOOM, done! LOL

Key light was the Glow EZ Lock Deep Parabolic 48″

The client hired my partner to create a promotional film of the show and some of the processes I’ve described above are included. That film can be found here.

It really pleases me when my client is very happy with one of the executed concepts!